How Stanley Jigs Was Born

Lonnie Stanley may not have invented the jig, but he sure made it and the spinnerbait much better baits.

Lonnie Stanley may not have invented the jig, but he sure made it and the spinnerbait much better baits.

The jig and pig is certainly not new to bass fishing. Jigs in various forms had been staples in anglers’ tackle boxes for generations before Bo Dowden won Bassmaster Classic X on the St. Lawrence River in upstate New York. Since that time, though, the simple combination of a hook, lead head, skirt and weedguard has been perpetually refined.

Lonnie Stanley, a two-time B.A.S.S. winner and five-time Classic qualifier, was one of the major players in those developments. He started Stanley Jigs in the early 1980s, and while he’s no longer the principal owner of the enterprise, he still works there nearly every day, designing new lures. [Read more…]

Monday Trivia – Kirk Cashes In Answer and Winner (Oct 13, 2014)

Danny Kirk April 1999 Bassmaster Magazine/Gerald Crawford.

Danny Kirk April 1999 Bassmaster Magazine/Gerald Crawford.

We only had one person attempt this week’s Monday Trivia Contest sponsored by Gary Yamamoto Custom Baits. Although he got the first three questions right, he missed the last one. We tried to determine if the answer given was in any way attached to the correct answer but couldn’t find any evidence of such. Come back again next Monday for the next round of Monday Trivia. For the answers, please read below.

Forty-two year old Danny Kirk could only manage 8 pounds 5 ounces of Kissimmee Chain bass during the January 1999 Florida Bassmaster Top 150 event, but it was enough to outlast Florida stalwarts Shaw Grigsby and Terry Segraves for the win. He beat them both by a margin of 7 ounces, which translated into a difference of over $60,000 in cash and merchandise. [Read more…]

Monday Trivia – When the “Big G” Wasn’t So Big Answer and Winner (January 20, 2014)

Photo Bassmaster.com

Photo Bassmaster.com

Unfortunately no one won this week’s trivia contest. One really good guess but this serves to show you that because one good answer is on top, doesn’t mean it’s right.  Keep playing!

What does it take to win a three day bass tournament in the spring on Alabama’s Lake Guntersville?

What if you were allowed a seven fish limit?

Given the lake’s big bass reputation, it wouldn’t be unreasonable to believe that it might take a hundred pounds or more to get the job done. With a five fish limit in the upcoming Bassmaster Classic, many pundits and fans predict that nothing less than 70 pounds will get the job done.

Things weren’t always that way, though. Guntersville’s numbers of bass, and the quality thereof, are attributable largely to the lake’s massive grass beds, and under the Tennessee Valley Authority’s weed reduction program in the early 1990s, the fishery suffered substantially. When George Cochran weighed in 21 bass for just over 55 pounds (approximately a 2 ½ pound average) in the April 1992 Alabama Invitational on Guntersville, the overall weights were disappointing, but not necessarily surprising. It was the second win of his B.A.S.S. career, coming a little less than five years after his first Classic win, when he’d tallied a tad over 15 pounds on the Ohio River to outlast second place finisher Rick Clunn by 2 ½ pounds. [Read more…]

Monday Trivia – Shearer Answer and Winner (Jan 13, 2014)

Photo May/June 1982 issue of Bassmaster Magazine.

Photo May/June 1982 issue of Bassmaster Magazine.

There were two people that submitted answers for this week’s Bass Fishing Archives Monday Trivia Contest sponsored by Gary Yamamoto Custom Baits. One of them had a more correct answer and that was John Karbowski. Congrats John on winning! For the answer read below.

Today Kentucky angler Ron Shearer may be best known for his TV endeavors, but in the 1980s he was a solid competitor on the B.A.S.S. trail, with two wins to his credit and five Classic appearances. In fact, he made the Classic five times in six years between 1980 and 1985, missing only the 1983 championship.

His rise in the sport was quick – according to an article by Bob Cobb, in the mid-70s Shearer quit his job in a factory after reading an article about Roland Martin’s career. He started fishing B.A.S.S. events in 1978, and two years later led a tournament on Guntersville before faltering on the final day and finishing 6th in the first of Basil Bacon’s two career B.A.S.S. victories. [Read more…]

The New Vibration Bait – Rat-L-Trap

1977 Bill Lewis Rat-L-Trap ad.

1977 Bill Lewis Rat-L-Trap ad.

Vibration baits have been around since the 50s with baits like the Whopper Stopper Bayou Boogie, the Cordel Spot and even the Heddon Sonar and Super Sonics. All these lures had a good following but it wasn’t until Bill Lewis came on the scene in the late 60s and early 70s that vibration baits really came to the forefront of the angling world. His invention? Well he took a standard vibration bait, put a bunch of BBs in it and named it after his truck – the Rattle Trap.

What Lewis did was take a good bait style and improved on it tenfold. But it didn’t take hold immediately. The first recollection of his success didn’t even come from his own boat. Rumor has it that Bill Lewis and a friend were fishing Toledo Bend reservoir one day in the late 60s and came upon a group of anglers watching another pair of anglers wax the fish. It was a tough day where Bill and his buddy hadn’t caught a fish when they happened upon the excitement. [Read more…]

Scorecard Snapshot – Don’t Be a Baby! Answer and Winner

Photo Bassmaster.com

Congratulations to Paul Wallace for winning the Bass Fishing Archives Trivia Contest with his correct answer!  Read below for the answer.

Paul Elias played a critical role in the development of the Mann’s Baby 1-Minus, the first crankbait that specifically aimed to stay shallow rather than reach new depths. After a near win at Lake Okeechobee, he came to Mann’s with the idea for the bait.

“I was on my way to Mann’s after a second-place finish on Lake Okeechobee thinking I could have won with a shallower runner,” he told Mike Pehanich of Bassmaster two decades later. “I thought, ‘We have the deepest running crankbait. How about making the shallowest?'” [Read more…]

Scorecard Snapshot – Don’t Be a Baby!

Photo Bassmaster.com

Paul Elias played a critical role in the development of the Mann’s Baby 1-Minus, the first crankbait that specifically aimed to stay shallow rather than reach new depths. After a near win at Lake Okeechobee, he came to Mann’s with the idea for the bait.

“I was on my way to Mann’s after a second-place finish on Lake Okeechobee thinking I could have won with a shallower runner,” he told Mike Pehanich of Bassmaster two decades later. “I thought, ‘We have the deepest running crankbait. How about making the shallowest?'” [Read more…]