The Chatter……Eaker Shaker

The Eagle Claw/Guy Eaker Eaker Shaker. ICAST Best of Show Winner in 1998.

The Eagle Claw/Guy Eaker Eaker Shaker. ICAST Best of Show Winner in 1998.

A couple weeks ago I had the pleasure of visiting Guy Eaker at his home here in North Carolina. If you haven’t heard, Guy has a veritable museum at his house when it comes to bass fishing memorabilia, tackle and anything else that’s relative to the fishing industry. He was kind enough to spend the entire day going through old memorabilia he’s accumulated over the course of his 40-year career in the industry. But that’ll be another story for another time and one you won’t want to miss.

All that aside, there was one thing that I saw at Guy’s house that jogged my memory and is something I can share with you today as a stand-alone piece. That one thing was the Eaker Shaker. [Read more…]

Monday Trivia – Shaw in the Sunshine Answer and Winner (May 19, 2014)

Shaw Grigsby bookUnfortunately we didn’t have a winner in this week’s trivia contest sponsored by GYCB. Come back next week and try again. Until then, the answers from this week’s quiz are below.

These days both major tours seem to make at least one stop in Florida every year. In fact, some years a single tour will hold multiple events in the Sunshine State. That wasn’t always the case. Prior to holding a Top 150 on Toho and an Invitational on the St. Johns River on back-to-back weeks in 1999, B.A.S.S. hadn’t been held a major tournament in Florida in seven years.

The Florida residents made sure to show that they enjoyed home cooking upon their return. While Georgia pro Danny Kirk won the Top 150 on Toho, Floridians Terry Segraves and Shaw Grigsby were tied for 2nd, just 7 ounces back. The following week, at the St. Johns Eastern Invitational, Grigsby outlasted the rest of the field over two days of competition to claim his sixth B.A.S.S. victory, and the first from a tournament headquartered in Florida. He’d previously won three times in Texas, once in Georgia and once on Lake Seminole. [Read more…]

A Record That Won’t Be Broken

Rip Nunnery gets help hoisting his 15-bass limit from Blake Honeycutt (L), Bill Dance (C) and Ray Scott (R). Photo Fall 1969 issue of Bassmaster Magazine. A signed copy of this picture can be seen at Bob's Fishing Tackle in Norwalk, CA along with the mounted stringer of fish.

Rip Nunnery gets help hoisting his 15-bass limit from Blake Honeycutt (L), Bill Dance (C) and Ray Scott (R). Photo Fall 1969 issue of Bassmaster Magazine. A signed copy of this picture can be seen at Bob’s Fishing Tackle in Norwalk, CA along with the mounted stringer of fish.

[Editor’s Note:  Ken Duke of Bassmaster.com wrote a fantastic article in August 2009 about Rip and his catch. To read his article, “World’s Greatest Fishing Hole,” click here. Also to read a second article on Rip, “Twig Pigs and Bush Hogs,” click here. I’d also like to thank Ken for bringing a couple of things to my attention. First, Rip’s real name is spelled with one ‘s’ (heck I just called him Rip) and two, he passed in 2007, not 2004. Thanks Ken for the heads-up!]

Everyone knows who holds the all-time one-day B.A.S.S. weight record. Dean Rojas, right? Dean had a magical day on Toho back in 2001 and brought five bass to the scales that weighed 45-02. Rojas also held the 4-day weight record (108-12) for a couple years until it was broken in 2007 by Steve Kennedy (122-14) and again by Paul Elias with an absolutely stupid mass of fish that weighed 132-08. Folks, that’s 20 fish that averaged 6.625 pounds each.

Yeah, those records are all cemented in our melons and we can spout them out like Rain Man at any moment we need. But who knows who holds the all-time one-day record for the original 15-fish limit and what it weighed? [Read more…]

Mister Twister – More of the Same

1980 Mister Twister Ad.

Here’s more proof that a large number of baits/tackle are retreads from the past. Take for example the 1980 vintage Mister Twister ad here. In it you’ll see two products that are prevalent today except that the Mister Twister products didn’t gain much popularity and were soon relegated to the bargain bins. Today’s “copies,” though, are in the arsenal of nearly every basser.

For example, by 1980 the Twister Sassy Shad, one of the first boot-tails on the market, was enjoying phenomenal sales. It was selling so well that Mister Twister decided to put a boot tail on nearly every bait they made. Unfortunately, the Sassy Worm didn’t cut the mustard and faded into obscurity shortly thereafter. The boot-tail worm was dead. [Read more…]

Flippin’: A Concept. Not Just a Technique – Part Two

Dee Thomas congratulates Gary Klein on his first Bassmaster win at Lake Powell in 1979. Klein won the event flipping. Photo Bass Master Magazine July/August, 1979 Issue.

This is part two of a three-part series on the concept of flipping and the effect it had on the sport. In this installment, we talked with Gary Klein and Basil Bacon about their involvement with the early years of the technique. Click to read Part One and Part Three.

 

In part one of this piece, Dave Myers talked about the three factors that came together to form the concept of Flippin’. He also talked about how an angler could thoroughly pick apart a shoreline in half the time it’d take an angler using conventional methods.

For part two, I had the pleasure of interviewing two other anglers who took the ground rules developed by Thomas and added considerably to its foundation. Gary Klein and Basil Bacon both played pivotal roles in the progression of flipping and the way anglers approach shallow targets today

These two anglers not only helped flipping progress, they helped design new equipment, terminal tackle and baits to increase the effectiveness of the technique. [Read more…]