1975 Bassmaster Classic by Bob McNally

Harold Sharp (center) weighs Roger Moore's (behind Sharp) fish as Fishing Facts editor Spence Petros (left) looks on. Photo by Bob McNally.

Harold Sharp (center) weighs Roger Moore’s (behind Sharp) fish as Fishing Facts editor Spence Petros (left) looks on. Bassmaster Magazine editor Bob Cobb is in the right bottom corner. Photo by Bob McNally.

I recently received some photos from long-time outdoor writer, videographer and angler Bob McNally. Within the 20 or so photos he sent were five photographs taken at the 1975 Bassmaster Classic held at Currituck Sound, NC. We previously wrote about the 1975 Classic, in which rookie Bassmaster Tour angler Jack Hains won by six pounds over Marvin Baker. [Read more…]

Monday Trivia – A Second Win for Hains Answers and Winner (December 2, 2013)

Jack Hains 1975 Classic winner. Photo Bassmaster.com

Jack Hains 1975 Classic winner. Photo Bassmaster.com

Congratulations to Keith for winning this week’s Monday Trivia Contest! For the answers read below.

Louisiana pro Jack Hains is certainly best known for his win in the 1975 Bassmaster Classic on North Carolina’s Currituck Sound. While Hains was from Louisiana and had guided on Toledo Bend, he clearly took a liking to that part of the country, because the next time he won in B.A.S.S. competition it was just a few hours up the road in South Hill, Virginia, at Kerr Reservoir (AKA, Buggs Island). Seventeen years after his first win, Hains outlasted Basil Bacon by a mere 5 ounces to win the 1992 Virginia Bassmaster Invitational. [Read more…]

Monday Trivia – A Second Win for Hains (December 2, 2013)

Jack Hains 1975 Classic winner. Photo Bassmaster.com

Jack Hains 1975 Classic winner. Photo Bassmaster.com

Louisiana pro Jack Hains is certainly best known for his win in the 1975 Bassmaster Classic on North Carolina’s Currituck Sound. While Hains was from Louisiana and had guided on Toledo Bend, he clearly took a liking to that part of the country, because the next time he won in B.A.S.S. competition it was just a few hours up the road in South Hill, Virginia, at Kerr Reservoir (AKA, Buggs Island). Seventeen years after his first win, Hains outlasted Basil Bacon by a mere 5 ounces to win the 1992 Virginia Bassmaster Invitational. [Read more…]

Season at a Glance: 1975 Bassmaster Trail – Part Three

Ray Scott presents Jack Hains with the $15,000 winners check after winning the 1975 Bassmaster Classic on Currituck Sound. Photo February 1976 issue of Bassmaster Magazine.

Ray Scott presents Jack Hains with the $15,000 winners check after winning the 1975 Bassmaster Classic on Currituck Sound. Photo February 1976 issue of Bassmaster Magazine.

[Editor’s Note: This is part 3 of a three-part series on the 1975 Bassmaster Trail season. To read part 1 click here, to read part 2 click here. To read about the 1975 federation Chapter Championship, click here and to read about the Classic contenders, click here.]

The conclusion of the 1975 Bassmaster Trail season ended as it had three other times in the recent past. Roland Martin won the AOY award. In the top 10 were also the now-household names of Ricky Green (4) and Tom Mann (9). [Read more…]

The First Drive-Through Bass Master Classic Weigh-In

[Editor’s Note: Since starting this site, I have been blessed by numerous people sending me ideas for articles about things that are relevant to the history of bass fishing. One of these people is none other than the first Bass Master Tournament Director, Harold Sharp. Harold, as you may well know, is an encyclopedia when it comes to the history of BASS (with or without periods) and all bass fishing. Harold has been an integral part of this site already, always there for me to bounce ideas off of or to proof an article before it gets published.

Recently after reading the series on the 1971 Bass Master Tournament Trail, Harold sent me an email documenting how the first drive-through weigh-in came about. Here are his words on that historic event.]

The first Bass Master Classics were all secret events where the anglers, media, no one knew the location. The boats were trucked to the event site, in the dead of night, so no one would be tipped off, and then were stored prior to the event. [Read more…]