Smallmouth Magazine

Smallmouth Magazine published by Smallmouth Inc, began in 1987 and lasted five years. Photo cover of the March/April 1990 issue.

Smallmouth Magazine published by Smallmouth Inc, began in 1987 and lasted five years. Photo cover of the March/April 1990 issue.

When Ray Scott founded B.A.S.S. in 1967, the “B” stood for “Bass” – not specifically largemouth bass. It was meant to be inclusive, certainly with smallmouths and spotted bass under its umbrella. Later, long after he’d sold the organization, they expressly embraced bass diversity to include the so-called “B.A.S.S. Slam” of nine different species. Nevertheless, for a majority of bass anglers, in the early years the de facto meaning of the “B” was largemouth, since green bass were generally more readily available nationwide. There was certainly coverage of the other species of bass, but it was limited, and B.A.S.S. did not hold a major tournament on a traditional northern fishery until 1977 when Jim Rogers won the New York Invitational on the St. Lawrence River (Terry previously discussed Roger Lures and the associated tackle store here). [Read more…]

History In Pics: Pre-Wrap Wraps (Boats)?

Charlie Brewers pre-wrap bass boat from the early 1970s.

Charlie Brewers pre-wrap bass boat from the early 1970s.

I’ve tracked down what I believe is the first professional tournament boat considered to be truly “wrapped”, displaying a sponsor companies logo design over the entire boat. However, this isn’t that boat, as I’m still trying to obtain a picture of that rig. Before wraps though, there have been quite a few instances of “advertising” placed on rigs, much of which looked pretty “tacky” by today’s standards. In the Midwest, being a field editor for a national magazine and displaying that on your boat was one of the earliest concepts in this regard. One of the best looking bass boats I’ve found with such a display was the rig ran by Charlie Brewer, owner of Crazy Head Lures, and then Fishing Facts field editor. Both identities are displayed on his early 1970s rig above.

Bass History in Photos – A Quartet of Smallmouth Greatness

Editors Note: The old adage is that “A picture is worth a thousand words.” So many times while looking through old books and magazines, we’ll come across photos that seem to just reach out and grab our attention for one reason or another. Oftentimes, there really isn’t a story or post ready or needed to go along with these shots. As such, we’ve decided to add a new category to the Bass Fishing Archives site titled ‘History in Photos.’ These posts will simply be a picture with a caption, no story attached. Hopefully you’ll find these old photos as interesting as we do, and perhaps you, our readers, can be the ones to lend some storyline to them via your comments.

(l to r) Jerry McKinnis, Charlie Brewer, Inky Gilmore and Billy Westmoreland. "This was a Lake Cumberland, Kentucky catch; the temperature was 9 degrees and the wind was strong." - December 1973, Fishing Facts

(l to r) Jerry McKinnis, Charlie Brewer, Inky Gilmore and Billy Westmoreland. “This was a Lake Cumberland, Kentucky catch; the temperature was 9 degrees and the wind was strong.” – December 1973, Fishing Facts

The Crazy Head Lure Company

Charlie Brewer. Photo courtesy of Charlie Brewer Jr., Charlie Brewer on Slider Fishin' 1978.

Charlie Brewer. Photo courtesy of Charlie Brewer Jr., Charlie Brewer on Slider Fishin’ 1978.

In the world of bass fishing there’s huge controversy over who and where finesse fishing got its start. There are good arguments for many parts of the nation and who played their part, but personally it doesn’t matter to me anymore. Necessity is the mother of invention and when it comes to fishing, there is no group more ingenious than bass anglers who want to catch more fish.

That’s what this story is about. A man who loved to catch fish and would go to extreme lengths to do so and in the process, develop a whole new philosophy pertaining to bass fishing.

That man was Charlie Brewer – his invention, Slider Fishing. [Read more…]