Pre-HydroWave Sound Emitting Electronics

An early Hydrowave predecessor?

An early Hydrowave predecessor?

If you’re a bassin professional, you can’t take too many chances by not using something that might be giving your competitor an advantage. Every ounce can be critical, and just one extra fish a day may make the difference between a check and a long drive on to the next event. For example, there’s probably not a single FLW or Bass Elite Touring Pro that doesn’t have at least one side imaging unit of some sort on their boat, even if they’re a dedicated shallow water kind of basser.   Similarly, I’m starting to see more and more boats with HydroWave units mounted on them. I haven’t spoken to any of the pros myself, but I’m guessing some of them aren’t overly convinced it makes a difference. Still, if you finish behind too many guys too many times who claim that their unit was key, you at least have to go into defensive mode.

But this post isn’t about the newest and greatest. Instead, let’s take a look at an electronic unit built for attracting fish and introduced well before the HydroWave. Turn back your time clock if you will for this brief history lesson.

The immediate predecessor to the HydroWave unit was the Biosonix units, including the RF-300 and the T-200P, even endorsed by some of the same pros. Created, in part, with the help of William Lewis (Rat-L-Trap), Dr. Loren Hill, and Dr. Stephen Holt, the patents on this go back to 2004, but the work was started at least as early as 1998.   But there was a unit pre-dating these by a good 2 to 3 decades, barely after the advent of professional bass fishing, and certainly long before the modern day electronic bass pro.

Look at everything you get!

Look at everything you get!

The Sears “Ted Williams” Model TR-VII Fish Call!

Able to be bought in the sporting goods section of most Sears stores back in the early 1970s for a mere $10.50, this unit was certainly well ahead of the modern day electronic bassin’ man. From the included paperwork, check out these features:

  • Tested by the center of Advanced Marine Studies, A Jacques Cousteau Group Company in Marseilles, France
  • Precision Transistorized Fish Call transmits sonic fish-attracting sound waves in the 10 to 100 CPS range
  • It has a 17-foot cord to lower into the water, and a clip on battery compartment for mobility
  • Fish also attracted by light and non-toxic attractor pellets that contain ground sorghum, soybean meal, meat & bone meal, alfalfa meal, wheat middlings, hominy, potassium iodide, salt and rice bran. This was used to help attract baitfish to the area in addition to the gamefish that would be attracted by the lights and electronic pulsations emitted.
  • Runs on 2 penlight ‘AA’ batteries (Included)
  • “Secrets of Successful Fishing” booklet included.

No promises on whether this unit ever “ignited a feeding frenzy” as the HydroWave units now advertise, but chances are somebody somewhere figured they might have an advantage over other anglers by using just such a device.