Lowrance Red Box

Lowrance Red Box Lo-K-Tor. Photo Earl Schmidt.

Lowrance Red Box Lo-K-Tor. Photo Earl Schmidt.

A week or so ago we received a comment from a gentleman named Earl Schmidt regarding our Lowrance Electronics Manufacturing Company (LEMCO) post from June of last year. In that post we discussed an ad from 1962 where Lowrance was advertising three products; their 505 Green Box, their book “The Facts of Electronic Fishing,” and a portable game caller. After that post, Brian commented that before the Green Box there was reported to be a Red Box.

Well, Mr Schmidt has been using Lowrance products since the first Red Boxes and he not only has a collection of Red and Green boxes, he was willing to send us some pictures and early ads.

Here is some information Earl provided regarding the Red Box vs. the Green Box.

Lowrance Red Box Lo-K-Tor. Photo Earl Schmidt.

Lowrance Red Box Lo-K-Tor. Photo Earl Schmidt.

The transducer and cable were larger for the Red Box than for the subsequent Green Box. Also the transducer cable screwed into the Red Box unit instead of plugging in as with the Green Box. The Red Box battery case screwed shut instead of snapping shut. The batteries in the Red Box were placed in vertically, not horizontally as in the Green Box. The face of the Red Box was glass and its depth scale was 80 feet.

Below are more pictures of Earl’s Red Box and more vintage ads. Thanks Earl for sharing this with us!

Lowrance Red Box transducer cable. Photo Earl Schmidt.

Lowrance Red Box transducer cable. Photo Earl Schmidt.

Lowrance Red Box electronics. Photo Earl Schmidt.

Lowrance Red Box electronics. Photo Earl Schmidt.

Lowrance ad from Popular Mechanics circa late 1958. Photo courtesy of Earl Schmidt.

Lowrance ad from Popular Mechanics circa late 1958. Photo courtesy of Earl Schmidt.

Lowrance ad from Popular Mechanics circa late '50s early 60s. Photo courtesy of Earl Schmidt.

Lowrance ad from Popular Mechanics circa late ’50s early 60s. Photo courtesy of Earl Schmidt.

Lowrance ad from Popular Mechanics circa late '50s early 60s. Photo courtesy of Earl Schmidt.

Lowrance ad from Popular Mechanics circa late ’50s early 60s. Photo courtesy of Earl Schmidt.

 Lowrance ad circa 1960s. Photo courtesy of Earl Schmidt.

Lowrance ad from Popular Mechanics circa late ’50s early 60s. Photo courtesy of Earl Schmidt.

 Lowrance ad circa 1960s. Photo courtesy of Earl Schmidt.

Lowrance ad from Popular Mechanics circa late ’50s early 60s. Photo courtesy of Earl Schmidt.

Lowrance ad from Popular Mechanics, circa 1960s.  Photo courtesy of Earl Schmidt.

Lowrance ad from Popular Mechanics circa late ’50s early 60s. Photo courtesy of Earl Schmidt.

 

  • Bruce W.

    Wow, that brings back memories! We, my father and I, didn’t have a Lowrance, Dad bought a Ray Jefferson Flasher around 1968 or so, maybe they were cheaper? He fished in the OKC Bassmasters, they fished out of float tubes, but could use a boat to transport their tubes to the next fishing hole, some times 3 or 4 men and tubes at a time.

    He was sure that a “fish finder” would be the answer to finding fish. At that time there was very little information available on the use of a depth finder, and you really had to be good, to determine bottom hardness (rock) or softness (mud), find brush piles (even if you set them), determine how a ledge angled, let alone be able to “see fish”.
    I inherited that old flasher, and put it on my first bass boat. Thanks for reminding me of how things were then.

    Bruce W.