Can’t Get Under the Cover, Skip It Then

One of the first Skipping articles published in 1982 in Pro Bass Magazine.

One of the first Skipping articles published in 1982 in Pro Bass Magazine.

The technique of skipping a bait under docks, limbs and any other overhanging cover isn’t something that only the pros do today, it’s a technique that’s mastered by every single bass angler serious about their trade. Just search the internet for “skipping a jig” and volumes of articles and YouTube videos will flood your screen.

This wasn’t the case some 30 years ago as few anglers, even amongst the pro ranks, utilized the casting method – or even knew about it.

You don’t get many things past your non-boaters or the press, especially when you win a major event like the Bassmaster Florida Invitational.

In the early ‘80s, though, the technique came to light after a tour win and other smaller-venue tournaments were won skipping a bait across the water’s surface like a child could skip a rock across a pond. The angler that arguably invented the technique, Ron Shearer, had been outed.

I’m sure there were other anglers, and especially trick casters, who’d utilized the casting technique prior to Shearer’s wins but no one can lay claim to actually putting it on the map. That belongs solely to Shearer and you can read about it in Bassmaster Magazine and others published at the time.

Here’s an example of one of those articles, published by Pro Bass in early 1982, about Shearer and his New Skippin’ Technique. Interesting fact put out in the article is that Shearer utilized spinning gear for his presentation, whereas today most anglers are using casting gear.

What was new 35 years ago has become a vital casting technique that all anglers who want to be competitive must master.

We hope you like this look back on the history of skipping and the angler who brought it to the forefront.

One of the first Skipping articles published in 1982 in Pro Bass Magazine.

One of the first Skipping articles published in 1982 in Pro Bass Magazine.

  • The Fincke Tackle store regulars, in KCK were skipping plastic worms rigged with a 4/0 – 5/0 weedless hook and split shot using Johnson Sabra’s with 17# – 20# mono at least 10 yrs. prior to this article. Sila flex T5’s with plugged butts were the rod of choice until we went to fenwicks.