F+L+P=S: Bass Fishing’s Most Recognizable ‘Formula’

In-Fisherman's well recognized founding 'Formula'

In-Fisherman’s well recognized founding ‘Formula’

While it might be possible that Albert Einstein’s formula for his theory of general relativity, E=mc2, might be the most recognized formula in the world, that probably isn’t the case in the bassin’ world. I’m guessing the IN-Fisherman formula, F (fish) +L (location) +P (presentation) = S (success), arguably the one concept that the entire organization was premised upon, might give the former a run for its money. But what readers might find interesting is that wasn’t the original formula. Call it Version 2.0. if you will. So what was before F+L+P=S?

Based on several different articles and books I’ve obtained and read, the original algebraic fishing concept was a somewhat shortened version of the final formula, F+L=P. Take a look at the following examples of this.

From an August 1972 Fishing Facts article titled "Fishing Concepts That Will Work For You" by Ron Lindner.

From an August 1972 Fishing Facts article titled “Fishing Concepts That Will Work For You” by Ron Lindner.

 

From the 1974 booklet "Catching Fish" by Al & Ron Lindner & Bill Binkelman

From the 1974 booklet “Catching Fish” by Al & Ron Lindner & Bill Binkelman

 

From the 1975 B.A.S.S. "How-To" Book, Al Lindner's Bassin' Facts.

From the 1975 B.A.S.S. “How-To” Book, Al Lindner’s Bassin’ Facts.

 

The version that most anglers probably recognize from the opening picture appeared in the very first IN-Fisherman magazine ever published, also back in 1975. To date, I haven’t come across an explanation for the addition of the ‘S’ (Success) to the original concept, though it certainly makes more sense than the earliest version. In that original magazine, they defined ‘Success’ as “A positive fish reaction – making the fish strike or bite!” Perhaps not surprisingly, that strike or bite wording (and they were meant as two distinctly different possibilities) appears to be a Buck Perry concept. His early influence on angling in the Midwest is simply hard to fathom.