Heddon 1940

Heddon Rod ad 1940.

Heddon Rod ad 1940.

Yesterday we showed a couple of ads taken from a June 1940 issue of Hunting and Fishing magazine and today we’re going to continue on that track. This time, though, we’re going to talk about another company, possibly the biggest company with respect to bass fishing – Heddon.

First off we have a state-of-the-art rod ad featuring the Heddon Pal rod. Made entirely of steel this rod was compared with bamboo in lightness, balance and feel. Now although I’ve never cast one of these exact rods before, I have used a couple of bamboo rods and steel rods before and neither of them are a joy to fish with. It’s times like these where I am grateful I wasn’t born in the 20s, 30s or 40s. These rods are an absolute beast to cast with and are about as sensitive as Archie Bunker.

Heddon Crazy Crawler ad 1940.

Heddon Crazy Crawler ad 1940.

Looking at this ad it should give good reason why casting rods of the day were 5- to 5 1/2-feet in length. Imagine a 7-foot steel casting rod and what it would do to you by the end of an hour.

The next two ads feature two of Heddon’s top lures of the day – the River Runt and the Crazy Crawler. The Crazy Crawler is actually still manufactured by PRADCO and there are even some Japanese companies that manufacture Crazy Crawler-like baits. The design may not be one you hear the top tournament anglers swearing by but I guarantee you PRADCO wouldn’t be messing with it if it didn’t sell.

Heddon River Runt 1940.

Heddon River Runt 1940.

The River Runt, on the other hand, hasn’t been made since the early 70s. This lure holds a warm spot in my heart as it was the first crankbait I caught a bass on. Ugly as heck, it was one of THE most popular crankbaits for over 50 years and boy did it catch fish. It came in a number of different sizes and even came in floating and sinking models. It’s also one of the most collectible baits out there.