Monday Trivia – Roland’s Revenge Answer and Winner (April 28, 2014)

Roland Martin. Photo Bassmaster.com.

Roland Martin. Photo Bassmaster.com.

Well this week we had four contestants (really three) and none of them got the right answer. The closest was RichZ but he missed the Producto worm answer in question 2. Come back next week for another round and a chance to win a $25 e-coupon to GYCB! For the answers, read below.

When B.A.S.S. visited Lake Champlain for the first time in September of 1997, the lake’s riches were largely yet unknown to all but a few northeasterners. When the competitors left after the three-day tournament, however, it was a secret no more. The 111 pros didn’t set the Top 100 record for the number of limits in a Top 100 event, but the field did set a weight record for that series with 4,248 pounds, eclipsing the previous record by over 600 pounds.

Roland Martin came out on top that week on the “Sixth Great Lake.” He tallied 56 pounds 15 ounces of bass over three days of competition to edge out 1997 Bassmaster Classic winner Dion Hibdon by 6 ounces. It marked the 19th victory of Martin’s career, and as of this date his last one. The native son of Maryland, a longtime Florida resident, must’ve found something he liked in the northeastern waters, because his prior win, in the 1994 Connecticut Top 100, was in that portion of the country as well. In fact, three of his last four B.A.S.S. wins were in the northeast, with the third such tournament being the 1984 Hudson River Invitational, which he won by nearly 13 pounds.

While Martin’s win on Champlain didn’t necessarily surprise anyone, the manner in which he won it shocked more than a few onlookers. In a tournament expected to be won on smallmouths, Martin focused primarily on green fish, flipping a jig and pork frog on 50-pound SpiderWire into heavy reeds to average nearly 19 pounds a day.

In order to win this week’s trivia challenge, answer the following four questions about Martin and his Champlain victory:

  1. When Martin won on the Connecticut River, he surprised many fishing fans – not with his catch, but rather how he accessed them. What did he use to get to the fish?
  2. As noted above, when Martin won on Champlain a jig and pork frog was his primary tool, but on Day Three his reeds didn’t produce well and he moved to some rocks to fill out his catch. What Florida-made lure did he use to tempt the bass on the rockpile?
  3. Fourth and fifth place finishers Jimmy Houston and Charlie Ingram both used the same brand of spinnerbait at Champlain. What brand was it?
  4. While Champlain is clearly a northern fishery, northerners (and northeasterners in particular) did not fare well there in Martin’s 1997 win. Randall Romig of Pennsylvania (47th) was the top northeasterner, with Jim Moynagh (Minnesota) and Kevin VanDam (Michigan) finishing 24th and 28th, respectively. What major tournament did Moynagh win that year.

Here are the answers:

Producto Worm.

Producto Worm.

Martin used a jet boat in Connecticut to get upriver and fish for smallmouths with a Yamamoto Hula Grub. Several others used similar craft that week, but Martin was the one who made it work.

On Day Three at Champlain, Martin fished a junebug eight-inch paddletail worm, made by the Producto company based in Sanford, Florida.

Titanium wire Terminator spinnerbait.

Titanium wire Terminator spinnerbait.

Ingram and Houston both used Terminator spinnerbaits at Champlain. The lure, featuring a titanium arm, was relatively new at that point and sold for the previously unheard of price of $10. The merits of the special wire are still up for debate when it comes to bass, but there can be no doubt that they hold up well in waters with lots of toothy critters. Houston used a ½ ounce green/white/lime model with a turtleback blade and Ingram used a similar 3/8 ounce version.

Moynagh was already a well-known angler in the upper Midwest in 1997, but that June he established himself nationally by winning the Forrest Wood Open on Lake Minnetonka, along with its $200,000 top prize. In a field consisting largely of top touring pros, Moynagh was joined by fellow Minnesotans Craig Wicklund and Ted Capra in the top six, as well as Tony Capra in 12th.