Let’s Look Back – Part 29

It won't "always" happen, but my own experience shows it's often my larger baits that wind up catching my biggest bass.  You won't see an abundance of bass this size caught in the waters of the Pacific Northwest where this one came from. Photo Stan Fagerstrom.

It won’t “always” happen, but my own experience shows it’s often my larger baits that wind up catching my biggest bass. You won’t see an abundance of bass this size caught in the waters of the Pacific Northwest where this one came from. Photo Stan Fagerstrom.

Those blasted bass are forever endeavoring to get me to increase my already considerable inventory of various forms of profanity.

Why do I make that comment? Because just when I think I’ve got things halfway figured out those big-mouthed buggers often proceed to knock my latest theories way to hell and gone out of the piscatorial ballpark.

I’ve had opportunity to fish for bass in a whole lot of different places for more years than many less fortunate plug pitchers even get to keep on breathing. Be that as it may, I often catch myself thinking I don’t have as many for-sure answers as I think I should.

That’s not to say I’ve not reached certain conclusions or watched certain facts emerge. One of those facts involves the use of the product I’ve written about in my recent Let’s Look Back columns.

If you’ve read any of those recent columns, you know that the products I’ve been writing about are those made from the rind of a pig. I caught my first bass on pork rind. I’ve been catching them on pork rind lures or as attachments to lures ever since. I ain’t fixin’ to stop.

Lately I’ve been writing primarily about pork chunks of one kind or another. This time around I’d like to share a few thoughts and experiences involving pork rind strips.

As I’ve mentioned before I lived smack on the shore of one of Washington State’s best largemouth lakes for several decades. There are some super benefits for a bassin’ man to have his bass boat in a boathouse just about 60 feet from his front door.

One of those benefits is having a chance to experiment with are variety of lures. I expect over a large part of the past century I’ve done about as much of that as anybody. One of those experiments wound up catching some of the largest bass I ever took from the lake I lived on for so long.

And for those who’ve read my writing efforts in the field of bass fishing it won’t come as a surprise to learn that the successful experiment I have in mind involved pork rind.

If you’ve been around for awhile you’ll recognize the name of a lure called the Bomber Waterdog. The PRADCO folks were the latest to have carried these fine old baits in their lure lineup. I don’t recall exactly when it was dropped.

If you don’t know what the lure looked like it’s easy enough to find out on the Internet. Use Google as your search engine and simply enter “Information on the Bomber Waterdog.” You’ll find a raft of information including lure sizes and colors as well as some that are for sale.

This old Bomber Waterdog has caught some of my largest bass from Pacific Northwest waters.   You don't see the tiny spinner blade that originally was attached to the hind end of this lure when I first bought it.  I'll explain why in my column next month. Photo Stan Fagerstrom.

This old Bomber Waterdog has caught some of my largest bass from Pacific Northwest waters. You don’t see the tiny spinner blade that originally was attached to the hind end of this lure when I first bought it. I’ll explain why in my column next month. Photo Stan Fagerstrom.

Have a chance to eyeball a Bomber Waterdog up close and careful and you’ll find these older diving crankbaits had a small dime sized spinner attached to their hind end. The little spinner flickered and fluttered as the lure was retrieved.

I can say I uncovered one of what I consider one of bass fishing’s truths. It’s that your largest lures are often most likely to hook your biggest fish. You’ll note I didn’t say “always.” As I’ve said ten thousand times already in my seminars or my writing on the subject, a largemouth bass doesn’t “always” do anything. You can get by thinking “usually” or “often but “always” – no way!

The old Bomber Waterdog was made in different sizes. Some of them topped 4-inches. I caught fish on several different sizes in this lure and it was one of the larger ones that captured most of my interest.

It was those comments about large lures often getting some of my largest fish that brought the idea I’d been kicking about to reality. That idea was also responsible for me catching a couple of the fish that helped me win a largest bass of the year contest for five years in succession.

The contest was conducted at that time by the Oregon Bass and Panfish Club. I’m proud to say I’m an honorary member of this fine and outstanding club that’s still headquartered in Portland, Oregon.

So exactly what did I do with that old Bomber Waterdog and that pork rind I mentioned? Stay tuned. I’ll share the details in next month’s column. Whether you want to try the same thing is entirely up to you.

But I think you’re missing a bet if you don’t take a look at what I’ll be sharing. Those big mothers out there with ready access to deep water have probably seen more lures than you and I have.

I’m convinced showing some of those bass in my home lake what they hadn’t seen before was why they wound up in my boat.

Again – read my next month’s column and decide for yourself.

-To Be Continued-