Old Bass Boats – 1978 Part 3

1978 Fisher Marine ad.

1978 Fisher Marine ad.

We’ve been running Old Bass Boats 1978 for the last week and today we’re looking at the 10 manufacturers that make up Part 3 – from Dyna Trak to MonArk. Within this piece are a couple of historical tidbits that you may find interesting with respect to bass boat companies.

Through the course of researching the bass boats of 1978 we scoured over 100 bass fishing magazines from the time period and came up with 33 manufacturers that advertised that year. Some companies only placed one ad in one magazines while others placed multiple ads in multiple magazines. If there was an ad placed that year, you’ll find it here.

This is our eighth edition of Old Boats and one thing that bothers me is we know we’re missing some of the companies. Problem is if they didn’t place ads in magazines, it’s difficult to look back at them. If you or anyone you know has any information on boats from the past that we’ve missed, please drop us a line through the Contact Us form in the upper menu bar.

Now on to more old bass boats.

1978 Ebbtide Dyna Trak ad.

1978 Ebbtide Dyna Trak ad.

Dyna Trak (Ebbtide) – In 1977 Ebbtide placed ads in numerous magazines showing off their standard Ebbtide goods and introduced their new concept boat, the Dyan Trak. The Dyna Trak model was their Total Performance bass boat and was new for the 1977 year. By 1978, though, I couldn’t find a standard Ebbtide ad but found the Dyna Trak ad in numerous different magazines.

The ad was disappointing in that it didn’t describe anything about the boat(s) under that name – only going into a long drawn out rant about how long they’d been making bass boats and what their definition of total performance was. Dyna Trak last for a few years so I’m hoping that in a later edition of this column we can find an ad that actually talks about the boats in depth.

1978 Eldocraft Bass Boat ad.

1978 Eldocraft Bass Boat ad.

Eldocraft – The Eldocraft ad shown here has a couple of cool pieces of information within it. First off, the top portion of the ad is introducing their new 180V Cliff Harris Limited Edition bass boat – the same boat used for the American Angler boat shown in Part 1 of this column.

The second interesting part of this ad has to do with the words “Roughneck by Eldocraft.” Back in the 1976 edition of the column we highlighted both Roughneck and Eldocraft, both companies from Smackover, TN. Well, evidently Smackover was only big enough for one boat company and it appears from this ad that Eldocraft won the bout and walked away with Roughneck. The ad states that Eldocraft purchased Roughneck in early 1978 and it must have been really early as this ad came from a May/June issue.

1978 FishMaster Bass Boat ad.

1978 FishMaster Bass Boat ad.

FishMaster – Here’s a bass boat company that I’ve never heard of and have no idea how long it was in business. FishMaster was manufactured by RBS Fiberglass Forms Inc. and doesn’t come up as in business at this time. I like the name of the model in the ad, the Pro Bass Missile (I wonder what John Crews would think of this today) but I’m not too impressed with the ad.

It’s obvious the boat’s pretty fast by the angle of the hull and the position of the motor. Problem is it’d be better to see what the specifications for the boat are. Seems just about every boat company had the same problem – or maybe it was by design. In any event, the 18-foot boat was rated for a 175-h.p. outboard or could be fitted with a 260-h.p. inboard.

1978 Fisher Marine ads.

1978 Fisher Marine ads.

Fisher Marine – In typical Fisher Marine fashion, they swamped the market with their ads in 1978 – not only placing ads in numerous magazines but they had seven different ads that showed off their boat selection for 1978 (including a look into 1979).

1978 Fisher Marine ads.

1978 Fisher Marine ads.

As had been the case for a couple of years, Fisher Marine was wise to hire both John Powell and Bill Dance to pimp their goods, and I’m sure this had a pretty big effect on their bottom line – in the black way. So prevalent were they on the water in California and the greater west I can’t imagine them not being as popular everywhere else.

It’s obvious the gas crunch and recession was on as their ads really push how inexpensive their boats were along with being economical on gas. Couple that with them saying Bill Dance actually used their Water Strider III at the 1978 Alabama Invitational and you can see the boats flying out of West Point, MS. What has always confused me, though, is why Ray Scott or the other organizations used a Fisher Marine boat for one of their specialty events. If they did, I’m sure you’ll let me know about it.

1978 Gator Bass Boat ads.

1978 Gator Bass Boat ads.

Gator – Here’s another one I hadn’t heard about before doing this piece – Gator Boats of Louisiana. Their selling point was their dual-hull construction and foam core. The concept supposedly made the hull very difficult to sink due to two fiberglass hulls and the foam between the two. Great concept, in theory will work, but we all know how bad water intrusion is in regular wood, imagine what it would be like in foam.

What I do like about the ads is that they fully list all their model specifications, from hull weight to how much storage they have. Other companies should have paid attention to this newcomer in the bass boat ad industry.

In all, Gator advertised three models including the new Slingshot, a 16-foot hull rated for a 140-horse motor. Obviously the Slingshot was to compete with the Skeeter Wrangler.

1978 Glastron Bass Boat ad.

1978 Glastron Bass Boat ad.

Glastron – Over the year Glastron had become one of the most recognized and respected boat companies in the industry. And, when they got Rick Clunn to back them, they even had more credibility. Normally you could count on two to three Glastron ads in the past, in 1977 it jumped to five different ads, but in 1978 it dropped to one ad and only placed in Bassmaster Magazine. To top that off, it was an ad used in 1977 – the one with Rick Clunn.

Probably the last Hurst Bass Boat ad, 1978.

Probably the last Hurst Bass Boat ad, 1978.

Hurst – This was the third and last year for Hurst – and the 1977 ad should have given it away. I’m not sure why the company went under (it’s the boating industry) as they produced some great boats for the day.

 

 

 

 

 

1978 Hydra-Sports ads.

1978 Hydra-Sports ads.

Hydra-Sports – In 1977 Joe Reeves and company went crazy with Hydra-Sport ads. So, after going through about a dozen 1978 magazines without seeing one of their ads I started to wonder. Then I came upon the first ad on the left. What got me about the ad was it was a “congratulations” to Ray Scott and gang on their first ten years as B.A.S.S. In fact, the only way you know it was a Hydra-Sport ad is from the logo in the lower right. Pretty classy I might say.

Where Hydra-Sport had advertised in numerous bass magazines in the past, in 1978 all their advertising dollars went to Bassmaster Magazine. I guess they saw the ROI from B.A.S.S. and with organizations such a National Bass and others defaulting, why not.

1978 Icon Boatworks ad.

1978 Icon Boatworks ad.

Icon Boat Works – 1977 was the first year Icon Boat Works placed an ad in a mainstream bass fishing magazine – and it was pretty unimpressive. To continue to 1978, they maintained that mark. The strange thing about this ad, is the way Icon chose to showcase their boats. For one, it appears that they stored their finished boats not in their 40,000 square foot facility but out in the back. Look aat the picture at the bottom left – a boat leaning and sitting on the ground in what looks more like a picture you’d see from American Pickers. The same appears true for the other pictures minus the shot of their facility and the pic of the jet boat. It’s a crazy way to market your goods, especially from a company who was only in business since 1977.

1978 MonArk ads.

1978 MonArk ads.

MonArk – Like Fisher Marine, Ranger and Hydra-Sport, MonArk was big on advertising and this year wasn’t any different. MonArk placed three different ads in magazines – two of them two-page ads. Mostly MonArk was featuring their new McFast 150 and McFast SF.

1978 MonArk ads.

1978 MonArk ads.

The 150 was a fish-n-ski model that could handle a 150-horse motor. The SF was the sportfishing model of the same hull. I had a chance to ride and fish in an SF and it was a pretty decent boat to fish from – although it was a bit cumbersome.

MonArk was also in the business of making aluminum boats and their ads always featured some of their tin models and this year they didn’t disappoint.

That ends Part 3 of 1978 Old Bass Boats. We’ll have the final part up later this week.