Archives for January 2014

Let’s Look Back – Part 21

Porter Wagoner was standing in the door of his dressing room when I walked by backstage while the Saturday night Grand Ole Opry show was under way. He asked me to come in because he had something he wanted to show me. Photo Stan Fagerstrom.

Porter Wagoner was standing in the door of his dressing room when I walked by backstage while the Saturday night Grand Ole Opry show was under way. He asked me to come in because he had something he wanted to show me. Photo Stan Fagerstrom.

It’s a question I’d have difficulty answering.

The question I have in mind would be something like this: “Which do you like best – bass fishing or country music? The truth of the matter is I flat out love ‘em both.

As the title of this column indicates, it deals primarily with events from the past. When I begin reflecting on my own bag of special memories I don’t have to look back very darn far to remember times when my love for bass fishing and country music have rubbed noses.

In this column I’d like to look back at what transpired when I had a chance spend a little time in Nashville, Tennessee. That city, of course, is the heart of country music. And nothing you’ll find there provides more proof of what I’m saying than Saturday night at the Grand Ole Opry. [Read more…]

Anglers Marine – 33 Years Later

Anglers Marine Ad. Photo Western Bass Magazine March-April 1984.

Anglers Marine Ad. Photo Western Bass Magazine March-April 1984.

Bass fishing in the west may not be as big as it is in the southern states but believe me, what they lack in numbers of lakes and anglers, they make up for with exceptional fishing and high-quality anglers. And, where ever you have bass anglers, you’re bound to have marine dealerships that sell bass boats. It’s not a very difficult concept to grasp.

In the early 70s through the 80s, there were numerous boat dealerships that dealt with bass boats in the southern California region. Here’s a short list and the boats they sold just to give you an idea of what I’m talking about. [Read more…]

Monday Trivia – Reed’s Classic Crown Answer and Winner (January 27, 2014)

Photo Bassmaster Magazine.

Photo Bassmaster Magazine.

Congratulations to Steve Quinn for winning this week’s Bass Fishing Archives Trivia Contest sponsored by Gary Yamamoto Custom Baits. For the answers, please read below.

Nearly three decades after his Bassmaster Classic win, the late Charlie Reed remains one of the least well-known Classic champions. By the time he qualified for his first Classic in 1986, he was already past the half-century mark, and the victory that week in Chattanooga marked the high point of a B.A.S.S. career that lasted just 11 more years. His last event was a 1997 tournament on Lake Neely Henry. He finished 5th. [Read more…]

More Old Boat Wraps?

Mister Twister BoatA couple of weeks ago Brian posted a piece in here about old boat wraps – or maybe more correctly, what there was before the actual wrap. That piece spawned a lot of interest from readers and one of the responses was from Ontario reader Doug Cain.

Doug was kind enough to write and subsequenty sent in a picture of another pre-wrap boat, this one flashing the Mister Twister logo.

Here’s what Doug’s message said about the “wrap.” [Read more…]

1960 World Series of Sportfishing – Florida Version

Buck Perry with snook and two redfish caught during the World Series of Sport Fishing - Everglades, Florida. Photo: State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory, http://floridamemory.com/items/show/77015, Holland, Karl E.

Buck Perry with snook and two redfish caught during the World Series of Sport Fishing – Everglades, Florida. Photo: State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory, http://floridamemory.com/items/show/77015, Holland, Karl E.

Before there was the Bassmaster Classic, there was the World Series of Sport Fishing held from 1960-1968.  That first event held in 1960, won by Harold Ensley, was an eight-day event held at seven Michigan lakes, and it was multi-species, not just bass that were counted. In that first event, there were 58 competitors.

We also covered details of the 1967 event which was won by Dwight Keefer. For those stories you can reference;

Monday Trivia – Reed’s Classic Crown (January 27, 2014)

Photo Bassmaster Magazine.

Photo Bassmaster Magazine.

Nearly three decades after his Bassmaster Classic win, the late Charlie Reed remains one of the least well-known Classic champions. By the time he qualified for his first Classic in 1986, he was already past the half-century mark, and the victory that week in Chattanooga marked the high point of a B.A.S.S. career that lasted just 11 more years. His last event was a 1997 tournament on Lake Neely Henry. He finished 5th. [Read more…]

More Bass Boats – 1974

Bass Cat Boats ad 1974.

Bass Cat Boats ad 1974.

I know we’ve already done Old Bass Boats – 1974 but having recently come across some more ads of boats from that year, I felt in order to be complete, I need to add these to the mix. The boats shown below range from companies that we covered in that earlier article but there’s also some newcomers to the ring. For example there are a couple of new Ranger ads that I’d never seen. There was also a really early Bass Cat ad I’d never seen – it may have been their first ad.

So, without wasting anymore time or bandwidth, here are some more boats from 1974. [Read more…]

Weedmaster Weedguard – Guaranteed to Slow You Down

Weedmaster Weedguard circa 1974.

Weedmaster Weedguard circa 1974.

Here’s another for the Bass Fishing Darwin Awards – the Weedmaster Weedguard. You used to see them on just about every trolling motor in the 70s and even the 80s. The concept was pretty understandable. Keep the weeds away from the prop and you wouldn’t have to clean them off the motor.

But things weren’t that simple.

The problem with running a trolling motor in weeds is that although the weeds wrap around the blade and motor head – rendering it useless – they also accumulate on the trolling motor shaft. Add a big bucket to the head of the troller and you get – even more weeds get hung up on the basket. [Read more…]

Monday Trivia – When the “Big G” Wasn’t So Big Answer and Winner (January 20, 2014)

Photo Bassmaster.com

Photo Bassmaster.com

Unfortunately no one won this week’s trivia contest. One really good guess but this serves to show you that because one good answer is on top, doesn’t mean it’s right.  Keep playing!

What does it take to win a three day bass tournament in the spring on Alabama’s Lake Guntersville?

What if you were allowed a seven fish limit?

Given the lake’s big bass reputation, it wouldn’t be unreasonable to believe that it might take a hundred pounds or more to get the job done. With a five fish limit in the upcoming Bassmaster Classic, many pundits and fans predict that nothing less than 70 pounds will get the job done.

Things weren’t always that way, though. Guntersville’s numbers of bass, and the quality thereof, are attributable largely to the lake’s massive grass beds, and under the Tennessee Valley Authority’s weed reduction program in the early 1990s, the fishery suffered substantially. When George Cochran weighed in 21 bass for just over 55 pounds (approximately a 2 ½ pound average) in the April 1992 Alabama Invitational on Guntersville, the overall weights were disappointing, but not necessarily surprising. It was the second win of his B.A.S.S. career, coming a little less than five years after his first Classic win, when he’d tallied a tad over 15 pounds on the Ohio River to outlast second place finisher Rick Clunn by 2 ½ pounds. [Read more…]

Moynagh & the Football Jig

Professional bass angler Jim Moynagh, then, and now.

Professional bass angler Jim Moynagh, then, and now.

While the football head was invented by our bassin’ friends out west (see Terry’s story, “The Football Head – Just a Jig Head“), I think I can safely say that for most bass anglers east of the Rocky Mountains, we likely got our first introduction to the bait back in 1995 by a guy named Jim Moynagh. That was the point in bass fishing history when the former angler/researcher for the Hunting and Fishing Library series of books won the Don Shelby Invitational Tournament on Lake Minnetonka, beating out David Fritts by more than 10 pounds and pocketing $50,000. I say former because it was right around the same time that Jim had been laid off from that research position after 9 years of work, but it would turn out to be a blessing in disguise. Two years later (1997), Jim would go on to win the $1 million Forrest Wood Open tournament, also on Lake Minnetonka, pocketing another $200,000 in first place prize money using the same bait and technique, and his professional angling career was cemented. [Read more…]

The 1977 American Angler Oklahoma National

Old school Okiebug patch from Don Butler's Okiebug spinnerbait lure company, Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Old school Okiebug patch from Don Butler’s Okiebug spinnerbait lure company, Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Recently I was able to get a hold of a couple old Okiebug patches – a standard Okiebug patch that many anglers displayed prominently on their jumpsuits of the day and another that really intrigued me.

The patch that really caught my attention was from an American Angler Pro-Bass Tour tournament held in 1977 at Lake Eufaula, Oklahoma. The event, dubbed as the Oklahoma National, was sponsored by Okiebug. What got my attention first was Don Butler, owner of Okiebug, was close friends with Ray Scott – having been the first life member of the Bass Anglers Sportsman Society and also the guy who sent Scott $10,000 in order for him to pay for a direct mailing campaign he was trying to get rolling. [Read more…]

Monday Trivia – When the “Big G” Wasn’t So Big (January 20, 2014)

Photo Bassmaster.com

Photo Bassmaster.com

What does it take to win a three-day bass tournament in the spring on Alabama’s Lake Guntersville?

What if you were allowed a seven fish limit?

Given the lake’s big bass reputation, it wouldn’t be unreasonable to believe that it might take a hundred pounds or more to get the job done. With a five fish limit in the upcoming Bassmaster Classic, many pundits and fans predict that nothing less than 70 pounds will get the job done.

Things weren’t always that way, though. Guntersville’s numbers of bass, and the quality thereof, are attributable largely to the lake’s massive grass beds, and under the Tennessee Valley Authority’s weed reduction program in the early 1990s, the fishery suffered substantially. When George Cochran weighed in 21 bass for just over 55 pounds (approximately a 2 ½ pound average) in the April 1992 Alabama Invitational on Guntersville, the overall weights were disappointing, but not necessarily surprising. It was the second win of his B.A.S.S. career, coming a little less than five years after his first Classic win, when he’d tallied a tad over 15 pounds on the Ohio River to outlast second place finisher Rick Clunn by 2 ½ pounds. [Read more…]