Archives for August 2012

Old Boat Ads – 1972

Arrow Glass Trophy Mark VI Ad 1972

Now we’re rolling. In the 1971 version of Old Boat Ads we featured eight boat companies and their bass boat ads. This was up from four companies displaying their wares from 1970 magazines. The manufacturers present in ’71 were Astroglass, Glastron, King Fisher (Master Molders), MonArk, Ouachita, Ranger, Rebel and Thunderbird.

In 1972, though, five more companies decided to participate in the Bass Boat Ad campaign, while a couple may have decided their money would be better spent in areas other than advertising. In any event, the ads from 1972 showed that the bass boat market was getting really competitive and boat companies were beginning to jockey for market share just by the number of ads placed and the fact they were showing multiple boat models in their ads.

Here are the ads I was able to come up with form the year 1972. I hope you enjoy this look back in time. [Read more…]

Just Buy a Flippin’ Reel Would’ya

Gator Flip Flipping Bar 1980.

J&L Tool Inc. hit the mark when they realized a double handle was by far better than the single, counterbalanced handles of the day. Their solution was the ever-popular Gator Grip, a handle you found on nearly every serious bassers’ reels of the day. Its soft texture provided grip and if your fingers did happen to slip off a handle there was another close by the grab a hold of quickly.

Shortly after they came out with the Gator Grip, J&L came out with the palming cup that would fit snuggly on the spool-tension sideplate and give the angler a more comfortable reel to palm. I don’t think they did too well with that product because in 10 years of working at the tackle shop, I don’t recall any customer buying one let alone having one on any reel I spooled with line – and we spooled at least 200 reels a week. [Read more…]

Scorecard Snapshot – A Stepping Stone? Second Chance

Photo FLW Outdoors

Since no one guessed the correct answer Pete was searching for in this week’s Scorecard Snapshot and the fact that Monday is the Labor Day Holiday and there will be no new article, we are extending this week’s contest through next Thursday. If no one figures it out by then, we’ll give the answer. I’m sure you’ll think it’s pretty amazing.

A 20th place finish in the 1995 Georgia Invitational on Lake Lanier marked the top B.A.S.S. performance for Japanese angler Masaki Shimono. In a tournament where just over 10 pounds a day was good enough for 2nd and less than 6 pounds a day earned you a check, he notched exactly 21 pounds.

Shimono earned a check in his first B.A.S.S. tournament, 1991’s Megabucks event on Lake Chickamauga (which was of course won by Larry Nixon), then earned three more over his subsequent 22 tournaments. He fished his last tournament on the circuit on Lake Hartwell in 1996 with career earnings of $8,442. [Read more…]

Failed Electronics, Again

As Terry as documented previously, there have been plenty of examples of electronic gadgets that never caught on with the general fishing public. In addition to the BassTronics Pro-Guide, some others include the Color-C-Lector and various forms of pH monitors.

Combing through the December 1986 issue of Bassmaster, I found another: the Depth Talker. This unit could be connected to any brand of depthfinder and would then “announce the depth at regular intervals.” [Read more…]

Stick With Your Strengths – Penn 2-Speed

1989 Penn reel ad.

The 2-speed gearing concept wasn’t a new idea in reels even in the 1980s. Back in the 30s and 40s machinists tinkered with the idea in order to give anglers more of an advantage while fighting large saltwater fish such as marlin and tuna. The concept was always good but the technology of the time lent a lot to be desired.

Then in the ‘80s, Penn developed what would become the benchmark of 2-speed reels for saltwater. The reels were simple to operate, had limited breakage and flat out worked when hung to a 300-pound tuna or 1000-pound black marlin. [Read more…]

Scorecard Snapshot – A Stepping Stone?

Photo FLWOutdoors.com

A 20th place finish in the 1995 Georgia Invitational on Lake Lanier marked the top B.A.S.S. performance for Japanese angler Masaki Shimono. In a tournament where just over 10 pounds a day was good enough for 2nd and less than 6 pounds a day earned you a check, he notched exactly 21 pounds.

Shimono earned a check in his first B.A.S.S. tournament, 1991’s Megabucks event on Lake Chickamauga (which was of course won by Larry Nixon), then earned three more over his subsequent 22 tournaments. He fished his last tournament on the circuit on Lake Hartwell in 1996 with career earnings of $8,442. [Read more…]

The Youngest of the Young Guns

2012 Forrest Wood Cup winner, Jacob Wheeler, age 21

Anybody that follows tournament bass fishing has, by now, heard that 21 year old Jacob Wheeler of Indianapolis, IN won the 2012 Forrest Wood Cup on Lake Sidney Lanier just a couple weeks back. With the win, he set all kinds of records, including being the only angler in history, as well as the youngest, to win both the BFL All-American (age 20) and the Forrest Wood Cup (age 21).

However, Wheeler, who will turn 22 on September 18th this year, isn’t the youngest world champion (to win either the Forrest Wood Cup or the Bassmaster Classic). There was one angler younger.

Can you guess who that other angler is? [Read more…]

Flippin’: A Concept. Not Just a Technique – Part Three

Hank Parker flipping his way to a 1979 Classic Vistory. Photo BassMaster Magazine February 1980.

This is part three of a three-part series on the concept of flipping and the effect it had on the sport. In this final installment, we talked with Hank Parker and Denny Brauer about how th technique changed their careers. To read Part One click here and to read Part Two click here

Hank Parker

Although Hank Parker may not have designed a lure or piece of equipment having to do with flipping, he is arguably the angler who put the technique on the map for good.

Up until the ’79 Classic on Lake Texoma, flipping wasn’t much more than something serious anglers kept to themselves. Yes it had been the determining technique to win national events and had been written about in Bass Master Magazine – a six-part series in 1976 –still few anglers had adopted the long rod into their repertoire.

That all changed when Parker won the ’79 Classic – flipping had finally come of age. [Read more…]

Scorecard Snapshot – Don’t Be a Baby! Answer and Winner

Photo Bassmaster.com

Congratulations to Paul Wallace for winning the Bass Fishing Archives Trivia Contest with his correct answer!  Read below for the answer.

Paul Elias played a critical role in the development of the Mann’s Baby 1-Minus, the first crankbait that specifically aimed to stay shallow rather than reach new depths. After a near win at Lake Okeechobee, he came to Mann’s with the idea for the bait.

“I was on my way to Mann’s after a second-place finish on Lake Okeechobee thinking I could have won with a shallower runner,” he told Mike Pehanich of Bassmaster two decades later. “I thought, ‘We have the deepest running crankbait. How about making the shallowest?'” [Read more…]

Ads from the Past – Heavy Cover Specialist

Shimano Brush Buster ad.

As Terry Battisti has documented here, here, here and here, by the late 1970s the flipping technique was firmly established in the pros’ repertoires and in the bass public’s consciousness. Fenwick was one of the tackle companies that jumped on the flipping train early in its route, but others were slow to pick up the pace. Sure, some manufacturers rushed items to market that fit the parameters of the technique – namely 7’6” broomstick rods – but not all of them were truly suited to the task.

By the mid-1980s, Shimano made an effort to capitalize on the technique’s increasing acceptance and popularity. The Japanese reel manufacturer introduced the Bantam Brush Buster baitcasting reel, which noted on its hood that it was “Designed Exclusively for Flipping.” [Read more…]

Mister Twister – More of the Same

1980 Mister Twister Ad.

Here’s more proof that a large number of baits/tackle are retreads from the past. Take for example the 1980 vintage Mister Twister ad here. In it you’ll see two products that are prevalent today except that the Mister Twister products didn’t gain much popularity and were soon relegated to the bargain bins. Today’s “copies,” though, are in the arsenal of nearly every basser.

For example, by 1980 the Twister Sassy Shad, one of the first boot-tails on the market, was enjoying phenomenal sales. It was selling so well that Mister Twister decided to put a boot tail on nearly every bait they made. Unfortunately, the Sassy Worm didn’t cut the mustard and faded into obscurity shortly thereafter. The boot-tail worm was dead. [Read more…]

Scorecard Snapshot – Don’t Be a Baby!

Photo Bassmaster.com

Paul Elias played a critical role in the development of the Mann’s Baby 1-Minus, the first crankbait that specifically aimed to stay shallow rather than reach new depths. After a near win at Lake Okeechobee, he came to Mann’s with the idea for the bait.

“I was on my way to Mann’s after a second-place finish on Lake Okeechobee thinking I could have won with a shallower runner,” he told Mike Pehanich of Bassmaster two decades later. “I thought, ‘We have the deepest running crankbait. How about making the shallowest?'” [Read more…]